Gustave Moreau - The Apparition 1874-76 Gustave Moreau (1826-1898 French) Watercolor on Paper Musee du Louvre Paris France Poster Drucken (60, 96 x 91, 44 cm) günstig auf Amazon.de: Kostenlose Lieferung an den Aufstellort sowie kostenlose Rückgabe für qualifizierte Artikel Many of his works are on display at the Musée Gustave Moreau, a museum in Paris dedicated to his works. The Apparition portrays Salome who, according to the Gospels, bewitched the ruler Herod Antipas, the husband of her mother Herodiad, with her dancing. The 106 cm high and 72,2 cm wide watercolor held by the Paris Musee d'Orsay elaborates an episode told in the Gospel of Matthew 14:6-11 and Mark 6:21-29. Belgian art dealer Léon Gauchez bought The Appariton in 1876 upon its first presentation at the Salon where it was exhibited with several other of Moreau's works. Gauchez had already sent a Sappho painting by Moreau for exhibition in London in 1871. But this Jewish princess would excite the imagination of painters to become the archetypal femme fatale. Its surreal setting and mystic air, evoked by obscure architectural and textile opulence, contrast with previous interpretations of the subject, making The Apparition a key work for the emerging symbolist movement. Moreau was influenced by the Romanticism of Eugène Delacroix and Théodore Chassériau (his teacher), but focused on the femme-fatales and virgins often associated with Symbolist painting. which transfixes her, motionless, to the ground. This short episode gave rise to many works focusing on the figure of Salome, who did not, however, instigate the crime. André Breton regarded Moreau as an important precursor to Surrealism. flesh so fabulous and dazzling. 1490, Arearea no Varua Ino (Words of the Devil) [recto], 1894, Adoración de los Magos (The Adoration of the Magi), ca. Salome remains a femme fatale, even when filled with horror, in a long description he wrote about the work in chapter five of Against Nature (1884). dulled senses of man, more surely bewitched and subdued his power of The tall He then began to study art under his new mentor Théodore Chassériau, whose work strongly influenced his own. (Release Date: May 14, 2004 [EBook #12341]. On a feast on the occasion of Herod Antipas' birthday, the princess Salome dances in front of the king and his guest, pleasing him so much he promises her anything she wished for. He is recognized for his works that are influenced by the Italian Renaissance and exoticism. Artist Gustave Moreau painted ‘The Apparition’, also known as the ‘Dance of Salome’, in 1874-76. John the Baptist is beheaded, the head brought in a charger and given to Salome, who gives it to her mother. 1638-1639, "Zurbarán. It illustrates an episode taken from Chapter XIV of St Matthew’s Gospel. Bettina Wadia. You will receive mail with link to set new password. buckle, a marvelous jewel sparkles on the hollow between her breasts. Lost your password? glass windows touched by rays of sunlight, splendors of tissue and Regretful but compelled to keep his word in front of his peers, Herod fulfills Salome's demand. La Guerre et la paix, Musée national de préhistoire - Les Eyzies-de-Tayac. John the Baptist had been imprisoned for having condemned the illegitimate marriage between Herodias and King Herod. a neck-piece clasps her as a corselet does the body and, like a superb She was living, more refined and savage, will, with the charm of a tall venereal flower, cultivated in hands on the hilt of his long, blood-stained sword. Cette princesse juive va enflammer l’imaginaire des peintres, devenant l’archétype de la femme fatale. Part of a series of at least 8 closely resembling paintings and more than 40 sketch drawings, it is regarded a key work of Moreau's opus, symbolism and fin de siècle art in general. 11-jun-2018 - Bekijk het bord "Gustave Moreau" van Aad van Dijk op Pinterest. He is recognized for his works that are influenced by the Italian Renaissance and exoticism. Chapter VI. Gustave Moreau transforms this biblical episode into a fable, a painted poem in which the theme is meant to be edifying as well as a pretext for a dream. A girdle encircles her hips, concealing the upper part of her thighs, arms with tongues of fire, — vermilions like coals, violets like jets against which beats a gigantic pendant streaming with carbuncles and Her eyes dilate, her He is recognized for his works that are influenced by the Italian Renaissance and exoticism. A leading Symbolist, Gustave Moreau painted fantastical and mythological subject matter in a painterly and sensuous style.Moreau was influenced by the Romanticism of Eugène Delacroix and Théodore Chassériau (his teacher), but focused on the femme-fatales and virgins often associated with Symbolist painting. the woman's body with incandescent rays, striking her neck, feet and more execrable and exquisite. Upon its first presentation 1876 in Salon (French: Salon de Paris), the painting caused a sensation. myrrh. Pierre Marcel-Béronneau was "one of the most brilliant students" of Moreau. This rich ornamental decor, typical of the painter’s style, taken from the most distant centuries and civilisations, make this scene difficult to place in time and space, and adds to its enigmatic character. Harmondsworth: Oenguin, 1959. seized with giddiness, in the presence of this dancer who was less The head would then appear to her as the image of her terrifying wish. the horrible ascension of the head, brightening the glassy orbs of the She more energetically awakened the Moreau's paintings appealed to the imaginations of some Symbolist writers and artists. Lost in contemplation, he sought to now stifled the woman, dizzied by the whirlwind of the dance, Cabinet des dessins, Louvre, Paris Related Material Salome dancing before Herod The Tatooed Salome Commentary by Joris-Karl Huysmans The water ]. contracted eyes which were fixed with a ghastly stare upon the dancer. rainbow gleams and prismatic flames. Watercolor on paper. Trans. New York: Praeger, 1972. Gustave Moreau was a major figure in the French Symbolist movement, whose main emphasis was the illustration of biblical and mythological figures. hands clasp her neck in a convulsive clutch. This deliberately confusing technique has been attributed to an alleged consumption of opium and thereby caused hallucinations, though justification of such claims was never established. Related Material. Wishing to get rid of this troublesome person, the queen asked her daughter Salome, when she had finished dancing for the king, to ask for the head of John the Baptist as her reward. Moreau's paintings appealed to the imaginations of some Symbolist writers and artists. Against Nature. The Apparition Gustave Moreau 1876 Watercolor on paper 106 x 72 cm. Moreau participated in the Salon for the first time in 1852.